MOVE Osteopath's tips on posture for you - Move Osteopathy

MOVE Osteopath’s tips on posture for you

Dr Giulian Di Venuto – Osteopath

My number one tip is to maintain your body through exercise, stretches and an osteopathic tune-up or maintenance treatment.
Changes in posture are of concern to Osteopaths because postural deviation can produce excessive stress on the musculoskeletal system.
I often describe optimal posture as the position, arrangement or alignment of the skeleton that requires the least amount of muscular energy to hold it upright and to account for the constant downward pull of gravity.
Deviations of the skeleton, of only millimeters, changes all the angles. It’s like the leaning tower of Pisa…everyone knows as soon a they see it that it does not look right and that at any moment gravity will win!
I have always said, Osteopathy is like Engineering for the human body. We assess the body like an engineer would address a damaged building and figure out why the injured area is failing and causing pain. We address the foundations and fix the cracks. This is often why we will recommend that people get regular maintenance care and treatment and advice specific to them, their body and their lifestyle.
 

Dr Ashleigh Maggary – Osteopath

My number 1 posture tip is the – Rolled towel thoracic spine stretch
ash stretchThis stretch is great for correcting forward head carriage and rounded shoulder posture, and encourages relaxation after slumping at the computer desk for prolonged periods of time.
Roll up a medium sized towel, and lie over the towel as it’s placed from the base of your neck to the mid back. Keep a flat pillow under your head (to avoid over extending your neck) and your knees bent (if necessary, to avoid low back strain). This stretch encourages stretch to the muscles which shorten during prolonged desk posture (pectoral and anterior neck muscles) and provides slack to those normally strained (trapezius and rhomboid muscles).
Spend 15 minutes in this position, focusing on deep breathing and allowing the body to relax into position. To increase stretch lie with arms outstretched. You should notice the stretch will ease and become more comfortable. Discontinue if any pain occurs.
 

Dr Grant Sinclair – Osteopath

I see tight or stiff upper back and neck and shoulder area as a large contributor to poor posture.
I find this stretch to be my ‘go to’ stretch for anyone with upper back or tightness across the neck or shoulders.
Most people can do it at the desk driving car (at stop lights of course) or in between activities.

The Eagle Arms stretch
How to do itgrants tip

1)    Cross your left elbow under your right and twist your forearms so your palms come together in the centre of your body
2)    Bring your forearms away from your face
3)    Try to lift your elbow to your shoulder height
4)    Hold for 30-60 seconds right and left

Dr Hilton Blauensteiner – Osteopath

A lot of people because of sedentary work posture can experience lower back pain.
Here is an exercise to decompress lower back that I use myself, it’s great for easing the muscle tension caused by sedentary work and can be done easily in bed at night before going to sleep.
Instructions: Lie comfortably on back with legs straight and try to stretch by pointing one leg away from the head (towards the foot). Start by doing the stretch lightly a few times alternating between left and right legs. Next try holding the stretch quite firmly for a few seconds. [A variation to this position is to have the hips and knees bent with the feet flat on the bed/floor and then pushing the pelvis towards the foot on the same side.] If done correctly, this will have the effect of stretching the region right at the base of the lumbar spine, which is where the stretch should be felt. It is also where most low back pain originates. Compare left and right sides and try to stretch until both sides feel like they can stretch the same amount. As with all stretches, starting slowly and gently is a good idea to minimise causing further strain or aggravation.

Dr Jed Pullen – Osteopath

My postural tip:
The mouse often causes many problems affecting your wrist to your neck. Make sure your mouse is as close to the front of the desk, sitting directly next to your keyboard, with your shoulder relaxed and elbow by your side. This minimises stresses place on muscles and joints of the arm, shoulder and neck. The mouse often starts to move forward over the day, along with your posture, so take note to readadjust every half an hour.

Dr Bridget Vinning – Osteopath

I have listed a few different stretches/exercises because I find them really beneficial and addressing the posture problems I see most commonly.

  1. Foam roller chest stretch. Lying with a foam roller or rolled up towel vertically down the spine, place arms out by side on the ground. You should feel a stretch in the front of your chest, your pectoral (chest) muscles. Hold this position for 3-5 mins daily.
  2. Cat/camel stretch. On all 4’s with hands underneath shoulders and knees underneath hips, arch your back into the air, tucking your chin and tail bone under. Then lower your back towards the ground, looking up towards the wall in-front of you and with your bottom in the air. Hold each position for 3-5 seconds, repeat 10 times each day.
  3. Chin tucks/ posterior cervical muscle stretch. This can be done, lying down, sitting or standing. Nod your head forward whilst tucking your chin in towards the back of your neck. You should feel a stretch at the base of your skull and down the back of your neck. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds and repeat 3-4 times during the day.

 

Dr Vincent Cahill – Osteopath

There is two hints or things I get people to focus on
1.       Shoulders don’t look good as earrings. I think when people are stressed or anxious or even really absorbed in things they tend to walk around or sit with elevated shoulders loading the traps and neck.
2.       Concentrate on lifting your sternum at the computer. By lifting your sternum your shoulders will drop and your head will come back form the screen as well.
 

Dr Kellie Rawlings – Osteopath

My tips are regular exercise, stretching and tune-ups and being aware of the little things that can make a really big difference such as
–       limiting screen time (phones/ipads etc) especially on weekends.
–       being aware of your posture when lifting and bending and doing everyday tasks like lifting kids, groceries washing etc
–       good footwear if you intend to be standing or walking for a while – high heels can look great but they are a nightmare for your posture.
–       Don’t think it won’t catch up with you and you can get away with no exercise or wearing high heels every day, bending and lifting badly or simply not looking after yourself…… you will definitely pay the price!!

Dr Kieran Schulz – Osteopath

Would have something very inspired to say if he was not doing his posture the world of good by taking a well eared holiday, resting and relaxing……. Which we all should do more often!
 
 
 

One thought on “MOVE Osteopath’s tips on posture for you

  1. An exercise that really helps with my own well being is this: place hand [either left or right] around base of the stubbie and, using the other hand, remove screw top. Gently. {don’t want any mess now do we?}
    With a fluid upward motion, bring the neck of the stubbie to your lips. Enjoy!
    For prolonged relief of life’s little mis-adventures…..repeat as above.
    Cheers! Richard the Sparkle Arkle

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